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Ontario Driver’s License: Classes of licenses

If you’re relocating to Ontario and planning on driving, chances are you’ll only need a Class G license, which is necessary for driving a car. But maybe you have a job that requires you to drive a large truck, or you’re a fan of cruising around on a motorcycle. If this is the case, you’ll need to acquire different forms of Ontario  driver’s licenses. There are 12 in total, and we at Settle-in.com are here to help you understand them better!

Class A:

Obtain this license if you need to drive a tractor-trailer, or any combination of motor and towed vehicles where the total weight is more than 4,600 kilometres. Holders of this Ontario driver’s license can also drive vehicles in the D and G classes (with condition R).

Class A with Condition R:

If you hold this license, you can drive the same vehicles as a Class A license holder, except a motor vehicle that is pulling double trailers and a motor vehicle that is pulling a trailer with air brakes. You’ll also be able to drive class D and G vehicles.

Class B:

Maybe you’ve moved to Toronto for a partner’s relocation, but you are still searching for a job. In this case, how about school bus driving? With a Class B license, you can drive any school-purpose bus with seating designed for 24 or more passengers. You can also drive vehicles in classes C, D, E, F and G.

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Class C:

Here’s another employment option: city bus driver! Holders of this Ontario driver’s license can drive any regular bus that seats more than 24 people, in addiction to class D, F and G vehicles.

Class D:

This allows you to drive a school bus with a seating capacity of less than 24 passengers, as well as a class G vehicle.

Class F:

If you were an ambulance driver in your home country, and plan to seek employment here, you’ll need the Class F Ontario driver’s license. This allows you to drive any regular bus with a 24-person or less capacity, as well as ambulances and class G vehicles.

Class G:

This is most likely the Ontario driver’s license for you. With it you can drive any car, van. It doesn’t, however, allow you to drive a motorcycle, passenger bus, or ambulance.

Class G1:

If you want your class G Ontario driver’s license but you’ve never had a driver’s license before, obtaining this license is the first step in the graduated driver’s license process. It allows the holder to drive class G vehicles when there is someone else in the car who has held a valid driver’s license for at least four years. There are some other restrictions as well.

Class G2:

The next step in obtaining your class G license if you are a new driver, this allows the holder to drive class G vehicles. There are a few restrictions for younger drivers. For example, from midnight to 5 a.m. there is a limited number of passengers teens can carry, initially those 19 years or younger can only carry one other passenger who is also age 19 years or younger, and after six months, those 19 years or younger can only carry three other passenger who is also age 19 years or younger.

Class M:

For the adventurers out there who like to cruise the roads on two wheels, this is the  Ontario driver’s license for you. With it, you can drive motorcycles and mopeds, as well as class G vehicles under class G2 restrictions.

Class M1:

If you want your class M Ontario driver’s license but you’ve never had a motorcycle driver’s license before, obtaining this license is the first step in the graduated driver’s license process. Some conditions apply.

Class M2

The next step in obtaining your class M license if you are a new driver, this allows the holder to drive class M vehicles before obtaining a full M license. Holders need to maintain a zero blood-alcohol level while driving with it. With it, you can drive motorcycles and mopeds, as well as class G vehicles under class G1 restrictions.

M with condition L:

Here’s the license for you if you want to drive limited-speed motorcycles (scooters) and mopeds only.

M2 with condition L: 

This is the first license for drivers who want to drive limited-speed motorcycles (scooters) and mopeds only.

 

For more info on Ontario Driver’s licenses, visit Ontario’s website about driving and roads, or the Ontario Ministry of Transportation.

We at Settle-in.com hope this helps you understand your driver’s license options better. Happy trails!

 

Want to learn more about driving in Ontario? Sign up for Settle-in.com and get full access to “The Guide.” Read the “Transportation” chapter!

 

(Photos: John Picken Photos via Flickr, cc, KurtClark via Flickr, cc, Michael Gil via Flickr, cc, and Michael Gil via Flickr, cc)

 

This post is also available in: French

About Camille

I adore Paris, I really do. But who can pass up an exciting opportunity to explore North America? When I enrolled in a Canadian university, I experienced the differences between French culture in France and French culture in Canada. And there really are differences! For one, French Canadians speak French in their own way. The country is so vast and there are lots of opportunities to find a fulfilling career. While some cities feel like a mix of European and North American culture, others have a completely Canadian identity. And don’t get me started on the delicious, hearty food! The country is charming, laid back and full of life. I’m here to help ease your transition to Canadian living, and give you a few of my special insider tips. // J’adore Paris, vraiment, mais qui peut refuser une occasion formidable d’aller explorer l’Amérique du Nord. Lorsque je me suis inscrite dans une université canadienne, j’ai vécu les différences entre la culture française en France et la culture française au Canada et il y a vraiment beaucoup de différences ! Effectivement, les canadiens français parlent français à leur manière. Le pays est si vaste qu’il y a beaucoup d’opportunités pour réaliser une carrière enrichissante. Alors que plusieurs villes sont un mélange de la culture Européenne et Nord Américaine, d’autres sont typiquement canadiennes. Sans parler des mets délicieux et plutôt copieux ! C’est un pays charmant, décontracté et plein de vie. Je suis là pour vous aider à faciliter votre transition vers la vie canadienne et pour vous donner quelques un de mes conseils.